About your Search

20121121
20121129
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the church and for brigham young. joseph smith's murder first and foremost as a struggle for secession for brigham young, an additional 40 or so marriages, the expulsion of the latter day saints, the deaths of hundreds of mormon refugees on the trail west faced testing poverty and hunger. in the fall of 1847 however, there was cause for new optimism. the previous summer, young had led a group of nearly 150 pioneers to the salt lake valley, establishing a sanctuary for his church. that fall, young decided to reconstitute what his church called the first presidency, a church president with two counselors. after joseph smith's murder, the people had chosen the 12 apostles to lead the church in smith's absence. young as the president of the 12 quickly became the de facto president of the church, but after several years, he wanted to clarify and streamline ecclesiastical leadership so after his successful pioneer trek to the great salt lake valley, he asked the other apostles to affirm him as church president. almost all of the other apostles opposed young's proposal, which would augment hi
smith isaac granger. i studied him in great detail in a couple of cases he mentions that jefferson was a good master and that jefferson's son-in-law who ran things around here when jefferson was away, cornel raldolf was in charge he was an executive overseer. he was a good master. it in going through the record i found that he -- when he was strapped for cash, took isaac's daughter and sold him to overseer who took the young girl away to kentucky and she was never seen again. now, isaac didn't mention that in his memoir, why? i really don't know. maybe he told his white interviewer and the interviewer didn't want to write it down. maybe isaac didn't want to say anything that would hurt the feelings of a white man. maybe it didn't -- maybe it hasn't left my impression. we don't know. it's not there. it leads one to realize that there is a lot in these accounts that we really don't know, and that the psychology possible distortion that took place under slavery that we are still wrestling with. another person's memoir who i spent a lot of time with was peters to et. he left two memoir
with me, the sportsman at the children's commission did child abuse. the difficult reduced by cero smith -- will the prime minister help these victims by publishing the police files and a short police investigation takes place in to all the allegations into any cover-up. >> a serious issue being examined. extremely disturbing findings. we need to give every encouragement to the children and commissioner to make sure the final version of the report, on the specific issue he raises which is a serious allegation about a former member of the house, today confirmed they will investigate any allegations of sexual abuse that happened from 1974. i would say to all members of the house particularly what happened over the last few weeks, if anyone has information, take them to the police. >> mr. speaker, businesses are helping cut the boring deficit by paying tax on their profits but some multinationals appeared to be paying very low amounts, like starbucks and anderson. i wonder if the prime minister could tell the house whether he thinks the tax code needs investigating. >> it does need investig
of treatment available. the gene was passed along through abigail's family, she was born abigail smith and her brother died of alcoholism. >> he mentioned one line of. do we know much about him? >> he abandoned his family, right? he disappeared? >> he died of alcoholism. you died very early but of some accident because you were out of control or of sclerosis of the liver or brain damage or alcoholism. john quincy adams two brothers died of a alcoholism and two of john quincy adams three sons died of dhaka was some from his firstborn george washington adams died in his late 20s and as a young boy charles also died of it and one of the three songs survived as did several of the grandson's but this was a genetic trait in the smith family. just as in the quincy family, the genius which went back to 1066 and the crossing of the battle of hastings by all will dillinger town in normandy that still looks this and the english obviously corrected -- corrupted he was a baron running mate in 2015 that forced king john to sign the magna tara so this ran through the currency as well as alcoholism and for th
, ian st. who came back with -- smith who came back with post traumatic stress disorder. julian who served in the united states marine corps who was shot by a sniper, adam burke from florida who was hit by a mortar round. all of them came back, and what we share with young people when we do this work at the mission comets, what we share with young people is they were at a place in their life where they were on a new front line, and many of them were afraid, and it was difficult. and what we did with them at the mission continues was we challenged them. we challenged all of these men and women in the same way that we challenge young people in "the warrior's heart." we challenged them to continue to find a way to continue to serve. adam burke, who was hit by the mortar round, set up his own nonprofit called veterans farm. julian served with habitat for humanity. sean donahue became a youth hockey and football coach. ian smith did a fellowship at the mission continues and then did an internship at the white house with the first lady's office for her joining forces initiative. melissa e
. >> from the 12th annual national book festival in washington d.c., sally bedell smith presents her book, "elizabeth the queen: the life of a modern monarch." db is about 40 minutes.terri inn [applause] >> thank you so much, francis said that generous introductione i'm especially to be her today because our friendship goes bacto the990s hen honored the founding editor of the library of congress and it was his highly capable deputy editor. it fell victim to the first wave loss of funding, but this has gone on to be the top editor of the "washington post." as i have been traveling around the country, the one consistent question that i have heard is what did you learn that surprised you. >> the answer is that there was something unexpected around almost every corner. in my research, i made numerous discoveries about the way the queen goes about her job and about aspects of her character that people don't know about or don't fully appreciate. one of my main goals in writing elizabeth the queen was to part the curtain and tell what she was really like, taking the reader as close as possible t
, d.c., sally bedell smith presents her book, "elizabeth the queen: the life of a modern monarch." it's about 40 minutes. [applause] >> thank you so much, francis, if that generous introduction. i have to tell you that i'm especially honored to be introduced by francis today because our friendship goes back to the mid 1990s when my husband, stephen, was the founding editor of civilization, the wonderful magazine of the library of congress, and francis was his highly capable deputy editor. the magazine, unfortunately, fell victim to the first wave of infatuation with the internetedt and lost its funding, but francis has gone on to be a top editor at "the washington post.n as i've been traveling arounds the country talking about queenn elizabeth ii, the one consistent question that i have heard is what did you learn thati surprised you. at did you learn t surprised you. >> the answer is that there was something unexpected around almost every corner. in my research, i made numerous discoveries about the way the queen goes about her job and about aspects of her character that people don't
thank our author, sally bedell smith. that was wonderful. >> we would like to hear from you. tweet as your feedback, twitter.com/booktv. >> this book is about liberals, not democrats, who are often not that much different from republicans in many respects. this book is dedicated to that peculiar brand of american who self identifies as a liberal, live life as a liberal and which is more of us in america were liberals, think michael more, think nancy pelosi, think your local college professor. think of the driver of that crazy car with all the bush is hitler bumper stickers on the back of the car. think the checkout help with the master's degree in gender studies wearing the head band at your local whole food store. you get the picture, right? they dominate professions that we've a very large cultural imprint in this great country profession like journalism, the arts, academia, the music industry, america's fastest growing band of entertainers, sec this l.a. acrobats. who are these people who call themselves liberals? how does such a small tiny group leave such a big impact on our c
and the key mike the dogs had died when they took on the tv. it did not come out that way. smith said cbs was threatening him you have to concede. he said i don't think i had lost. wrong again. what are the polls mistakenly said the republican and is winning? [laughter] i am not worried about the exit polls. >> i thought you meant the 10 point* spread was in our favor. >> i don't remember the column actually i am suspicious. [laughter] >> what do you think is a possibility improbability of ending affirmative action and education. >> i hope very good. with the undergrad and law school center for individual rights we've got that case and one against the law school we lost because of santa day o'connor who said we need 25 more years of affirmative-action zenawi have a constitutional provisions with expiration dates. [laughter] and making the argument with empirical evidence it has been very harmful to black people. of a surprise. liberals try to help end ruin of black people's lives. if it is so little bit it is thought so bad that elevating people to schools where videos has higher scores t
. questions to the prime minister. henry smith. >> number one, serve. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i'm sure before answering the whole house will wish to join me in expressing our sympathies to the terms of the appalling flooding we've seen across our country in recent days. and also in getting support and praise to our emergency services, the police, fire, and the service and invited agency to local councils, and good neighbors will hold an extraordinary things to help those in distress. mr. speaker, this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others, in addition to my duties in this house i show up for the much meetings later today. >> the whole house will of course endorse the words of the prime minister in paying tribute to our fantastic emergency services responded to the terrible floods, and those who have been victims of it. mr. speaker, tomorrow sees the publication of the leveson report. does my right honorable friend agree with me that those who should be uppermost in our minds are the victims of previous media -- i'm fairly quick study agree with me that the statu
influential idea of adam smith that markets would read to the efficiency of the economy. and ken arrow was the person who actually proved, the circumstances under which it was correct. so anybody who talked about the wonders of the free market, he was the one who actually showed that adam smith was right. but in showing he was right, he also understood that it was only right under very restricted conditions, and the healthcare sector was one condition in which it was never right, and similar to my own work on economics of asymmetric information -- >> core understanding. >> what it showed is the reasonable the invisible hand seems invisible is that it's not there. and this gesture is a real case on point. >> just to add, all abstract reasoning, but thenk at reality and it's overwhelming. the -- looking across countries can the united states has the most market oriented healthcare system and the most expensive without getting better results. >> we're ranked 37th in the world in the world health organization in terms of quality. >> within the united states, although medicare is very expen
're not the old fashioned filibuster people remember from "mr. smith goes to washington" when senator smith stood at a desk probably about there in their mockup of the senate floor and talked himself exhausted reading from the baseball, reading from the constitution, he might have even read from the dictionary. i remember there was an old reporter up in the press gallery speaking about this and he talked about it being one of the great examples of american democracy, one lone senator able to speak until he's exhausted on pint that matters to him. people may have been frustrated by that kind of filibuster but there was at least a kind of noblity to it. the filibuster of today is very different. it's a threat from the minority party to bombard something with amendments so that it can't be managed on the floor. it's a threat to filibuster, to which the majority leader has to respond by filing cloture, and when the majority leader is forced to file cloture, the minority gets a benefit. they get 30 hours of debate. and, of course, as we've seen in the senate that 30 hours of debate is never used. it j
'm evan smith, i'm the ceo andy editor-in-chief of the texas tribune. i am pleased to be here with myt old buddy, robert draper, av veteran magazine writer and author whose latest book is "doy not ask what good we do." robert is a familiar face around these parts having spent thei meaty, early part of his career as one of texas monthly'sil marquee writers, in fact, us being up here together again ise kind of like dean martin and jerry lewis back on stage.rkey [laughter] eing a bit together again is kind of like dean martin and jerry lewis back on stage. he is currently a contributing writer to the new york times magazine and national geographic and a correspondent for gq. his previous books include dead certain and critically acclaimed biography of george w. bush, a comprehensive history of rolling stone magazine, and a novel, hadrian's walls. a native of houston and its and the university of texas at austin. please join me in welcoming robert draper. [applause] nice to see you. >> nice to be here. >> adelle we my star brought. we better off than we were two years ago? [laughter] >> i real
education or training. i spent a great deal of time at smith college when i started engineering program. and i found that all the students there were brilliant, of course. and that the course is inhumanities were rigorous and courses in science and engineering. what we were striving for there, and i think that many schools are striving for, holistically educated people that understand humanities and sciences. i think in this century, that you are going to be shortchanging yourself if you hire individuals that are only trained in the humanities that can write well, but have not been trained in quantitative thinking because they may get the first job, but they limit themselves. i just want to say this. because i have been dying to say this. for engineers, the same reason engineers go into that program, there is pressure to get the job. but we have misguided engineering students for many years because we come to engineering to get that first job. but we should tell them that we should go out there and create jobs. this is something that we have not done well in engineering. to teach the cr
chairman, lamar smith and i negotiated additional measures to be added to the legislation. i want together to produce a package of improvements that contained a modest expansion of benefit for deserving emergency medical responders. and a host of reforms to make the safety officers benefits program stronger and more effective, more cost efficient. the legislation will become one of the cornerstones of the partnership we have between the federal government and our first responders who make that partnership even stronger. in fact, the reforms that chairman smith and i developed in consultation with the department of justice and the first responder community completely offset the eliminated increase in spending. unfortunately, at that time due to an error made by the congressional budget office, the matter was dropped from the f.a.a. conference report. c.b.o. to their credit later corrected their error. they provided an official cost estimate that makes clear this legislation will result in new federal spending, and, madam president, i ask consent that letter be made part of the record. the p
about the wonders of the free-market free-market, he shielded added smith and also understood he was only right under very restrictive conditions. in the health care sector was never right. and my on were put the reason the invisible hand sphinxes invisible is it is not there. [laughter] but just to add them with follow the same system on outbidding better results. >> breaking face seven. >> daewoo cotte talk a run across control and the more successful ad. >> of veterans health administration actually a the doctors are government employees. >> you did a calculation showing if we had a health care system that was as efficient we would have no deficit given the baby boom. >> >> it is actually called medicare. with the supreme act the of of, so all of these same of, so all of these same this but our budget problems will be done. >> cell it better dismantle. it is incredible. it is a rejection of theory and evidence. [laughter] that is pretty impressive. >> host: look at the interface between medical costs and the budget. the idea we have to have commissions like bowles simpson with
, congressman lamar smith of texas, and i worked on other parts so that we needed up with an improved bill. we had a modest expenditure of benefits for deserving emergency medical responders, wholesome reforms to make the benefit program stronger, more cost-effective and efficient. the most important thing, we had c.b.o., which initially had concern, reviewed it and found this cost nothing. what we're saying, mr. president, since 1974, this country has recognized we have first responders who are killed, disabled in the line of duty. this came from bipartisan legislation. it's always been joined in bipartisan legislation. you have a police officer who is shot in the line of duty. you have a first responder, a firefighter, e.m.s., others who are killed in the line of duty, die as a result of their work in the line of duty, that they would have -- share in the same benefits that we provided for the whole country. this just clarifies -- this clarifies it for all first responders. it is hard to think of anybody who could possibly disagree with it. it costs taxpayers nothing. it does what we've alwa
was going to make them weather was an eric said right or a howard k. smith, the people that ed murrell hired for people of substance, historians. writers. leaders, people who cared about history. and sometimes when i look at what passes for news on cable television, especially these days, i don't know where they find these people. [laughter] >> he cared a great deal about writing. one of the point you're making earlier about some things that you wanted to last for three, four, five days before it would actually get on the air, it had to be written, and written well. merl cared a great deal about style and the way in which you presented information. it was always for me -- >> interesting. and is going to interrupt you for a second. take a look at how awesome, when you're watching something being covered on cable television these days, and it requires great skill. i'm not denigrating it in any fashion, but notice how often was your hearing is just whatever comes off the top of the head of a man or woman who is reporting. take note of how rare it is for a script actually to be written. now, you
, the bailiff says this is so and so, people versus smith, and the district attorney says i'm so and so, i speak for the people. i have a friend, and when the prosecutor does that, it's his turn, and he says i'm so and so, and i also speak for the people, just one at a time. [laughter] perhaps you want to go to law school because you have a particular policy area you're interested in, do what you can to promote environmental protection and think that working through the law is the best way to do that. you have to have a reason. there are better things to do if you can't think of something to do other than embark on a particular career path. >> thank you. i want to now turn to the court for a moment and a little on public perception, the only -- we read about the court and decisions on the court, and the common description is conservatives on the court and liberal on the court, and it's not the public's perception, but the media perception. is there a different way you'd like people to think about the court and justices on the courts than those categories? >> well, sure. i don't think it's a very
they announce a case in court, the bailiff says this is so and so, people versus smith. the district attorney stands up and says, i'm so and so, i speak for the people. i have a friend who is a criminal defense lawyer, and when the prosecutor does that, and its his turn, he stands up and says i'm so and so, and i also speak for the people, just one at a time. [laughter] perhaps you want to go to law school because you have a particular policy area you're interested in. you want to do what you can to promote environmental protection, and you think working through the law is the best way to do that, but you have to have a reason. there's better things to do if you can't think of something to do other than embark on a particular career path. >> thank you. i want to now turn to the court for a moment, and a little bit on public perceptions. the only -- we read about the court, and we read about the decisions on the court, but the common description is, conservatives on the court, liberals on the court, seems to be that cat -- category is the media perception. is there a different way you want peo
and republican strategist steve smith. that's and university of delaware and starts at 8 p.m. eastern. here on c-span2, author mark friedman talks about how more baby boomers are entering into a second careers. he's the author of the big shi shift. that's also at 8 p.m. eastern. >> ahead of the federal communications commission, julius genachowski, spoke yesterday about international telecommunications policy. chairman genachowski's remarks are about one hour. >> good afternoon. thanks for joining the conversation with fcc chairman genachowski. just some quick introductory marks, sort of normal rules of the game them sure you are all familiar with. welcome to our meeting today at the council on foreign relations. plump lately turn off your cell phones, blackberries and all wireless devices to avoid intervention with the sound system and as a reminder, this meeting is on the record. i'm very excited to be here today, this perhaps the most anticipated cfr event as much as the new james bond movie, since we rescheduled a number times but i'm glad that chairman to join us today. just a quick introdu
, what about that jimmy stewart movie? "mr. smith goes to washington" i saw that movie. didn't that poor man have to stand at his desk and hold the senate floor until he crumbled in exhaustion? why don't we see that anymore? the honest answer is there was some artistic license in that movie and the more honest answer is we have reached the point now with the filibuster where one senator can stand up and object to what is about to occur in the senate, stop the senate from what they're doing for at least 30 hours until there's a vote to resume business. let me give you two examples of how this played out in my recent memory. it was only a couple years ago when we were closing a weekly session and a last-minute request was made to extend unemployment benefits to millions of americans. we thought we had an agreement. democrats and republicans, we were ready to leave town. the junior senator from kentucky, not the pleernd, senator bunning stood up and said i object. by saying i object, he stopped the payment of unemployment benefits to millions of americans. and at that point i came to the fl
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)